Yerevan

Yerevan boasts an eventful history that goes back to the eighth century B.C., when a fort named Erebuni was built at the same site. Through a process of gradual distortion, the name eventually became Yerevan. Following the initiative of Yerevan UNESCO World Book Capital City, citybooks touched down in Armenia.

Gevorg Gilants

Gevorg Gilants

All Roads Lead To

Բոլոր ճանապարհները տանում են

Audio books in Armenian | Հայերեն:

play All Roads Lead To

Listen & Read

Armen of Armenia

Armen of Armenia

Radio Yerevan

Ռադիո Երեւան

Audio books in English:

play Radio Yerevan

Listen & Read

Arpi Voskanyan

Arpi Voskanyan

Yerevan Dreams: A Reportage

Երևանյան երազանքներ՝ ռեպորտաժ

Yerevan boasts an eventful history that goes back to the eighth century B.C., when a fort named Erebuni was built at the same site. Through a process of gradual distortion, the name eventually became Yerevan. After the First World War it became the new capital of the Democratic Republic of Armenia, which it remained even during the country’s Soviet period (1920-1991). During those years, Yerevan grew from a small provincial town with a population of a few tens of thousands to a contemporary metropolis with over a million residents. Today Yerevan is the cultural, political and economic centre of the country.

As part of Yerevan’s year as World Book City, deBuren together with the literature festival ‘Literary Ark’ invited a pair of authors from the Low Countires to write a citybook about Yerevan: Dutch writer and poet Serge van Duijnhoven and Flemish author Johan De Boose. Alongside the Low Countries representatives, three Armenian authors wrote citybooks about Yerevan: Arpi Voskanyan, Armen of Armenia and Gevorg Gilantz.

Belgian photographer Pieter-Jan de Pue, who earned his stripes in Iran and Afghanistan, fixed his vision of Yerevan in a series of 24 photos. The Armenian videographers Arpa Hacopian and Nare Hovhannisyan filmed the City One Minutes.

 


 

City One Minutes

 

Watch the videos at cityoneminutes.org.