Beyond Sheffield Train Station

Studenten Sheffield

Studenten Sheffield

A citybook about Sheffield, written by studens of the Universiteit Sheffield/SLC (School of Languages and Cultures).

Close

Sheffield All citybooks

Download the ePub Print

Beyond Sheffield Train Station

A citybook written by students

This citybook has been written by students of the School of Modern Languages at the University of Sheffield as part of a special university module constructed around the citybooks concept. A group of 2nd year students explore the impact and significance of stories and story telling on who we are and who we would like to be. The course included a creative writing element, which is offered by one of Sheffield’s citybook authors, Agnes Lehóczky. Under her guidance the participants explored their feelings about cities in general and about the city of Sheffield in particular. The students identified eleven streets, parks, buildings or forgotten corners of Sheffield. Each student tried to ‘capture’ their chosen site using their own observation, imagination, creativity and historical research. The end product is this collaborative citybook, which will be translated into Dutch and French and can be listened to and downloaded as an audio book (podcast) like the real citybooks.

 

The students:

Joel Baker, Christina Barningham, Victoria Beardwood, Savannah Dawsey-Hewitt, Melanie Hale, Rachel Jackson, Charles McDonald-Jones, Amy Seager, Amy Sheffield, Louise Snape, Glenn Turner

© henriette louwerse

 

Sheffield Train Station
Rachel Jackson

Alone in the middle of the concrete shell of Sheffield train station’s entrance hall stands a dishevelled student. Recognisable by the signature bed-hair and appearance of experiencing pain as their eyes slowly adjust to the phenomenon of artificial daylight. It is 7:30 in the morning. The shuffling of over-priced shoes and click-clack of inappropriately high heels increase in tempo as the drones of capitalism march past in office uniform, unaware they have damaged a couple’s suitcase and separated a child from its mother. They will make the train. A couple waves their last goodbye as one staggers backwards blindly towards the platform, unable to break eye contact for fear of appearing unloving. The stench of cheap coffee swamps the hall and the stale taste of business talk lingers in the warm air.

Seeking refuge the student exists the building. Water greets them and cleanses the senses to great relief. To the right, a metal monstrosity funnels the descending travellers towards the station whilst providing the student with a solution to bed-hair in its reflective surface. The sun has risen and given birth to an abundance of rainbows that dance along the artificial rivers to the delight of passing children. They stop and gaze in awe before the illusion is blocked by a parade of drones, following the water’s flow to the automatic doors of the entrance hall. Wind begins to tickle and tease the student before it grows in strength and whips any skin left exposed raw. The water joins the attack and so the student retreats back into the warmth of the concrete shell.

A mob of suits stands motionless, staring blankly at the elevated, mechanical timetable, which denotes their fate. The train is delayed. Irritable shuffling becomes animated pacing as the clock continues to tick. The student prepares to join the warm-up when a single number 6 flickers onto the board and the race begins. A stampede erupts and sweeps the student to the platform where the absence of carriages enables those who fell behind to re- join the herd. The ground begins to rumble and a piercing screech announces the arrival of the East Midlands service. They made the train.


Park Hill
Louise Snape

Park Hill i love you, will u marry me
Sitting, legs tucked up to the chest, sniffling, on the very highest point of a hill, in a broken and lonely playground.

Where the wind forces the shards of a Carlsberg bottle head first into the ground. 
Beats against the little brick wall and creeps between the gaps in your scarf. Makes your ears red and your knuckles blue. Makes your hair attempt to flee your head. Makes your nose run.

Where the hills roll down from every direction and carelessly spill out the city, forming a compilation of mismatched colours and shapes. Where the council estate behind stands like a tired army, pale and grey, bits of armour hanging off. Where chimneys spew smoke from the depths below, tarnishing the patterned sky.

Sitting, legs tucked up to the chest, sniffling, on the very highest point of a hill, in a broken and lonely playground.

Where across a stretch of unused road, the Victorian Pye Bank Primary School looms, empty and alone. Where if you think hard enough, children's feet trample through the corridors. The piano rings through the hall. Antiseptic stings of freshly grazed knees. Potato Smilies and mushy peas waft through the canteen. Gossip and untruths are whispered in the staff room. Screams of kiss Chase fly through the playground. The staple gun punches through too much coloured paper. Where little hearts excitedly pump blood around little bodies.


West Street
Glen Turner

West Street, heart of Sheffield, home to any number of bars, shops and restaurants. Stood opposite Tesco, watching the world go by, people of all backgrounds quickly brushing past you as you wait for your supertram. Old people struggling with bags of shopping, ready to burst, being swept by waves of students rushing to their lectures, already running late. The noise of traffic and general chitchat fill the air. Occasionally, a phone would make its irritating tune, distracting you from admiring this great street. As you gaze around you see buildings of all shapes and sizes, some scratching the clouds, others just a few floors high. Slowly, the tram grinds to a halt, the mechanical doors gliding open. Excited children push past you, as they’ve just finished school, wondering how they’re going to fill their day. You get on, anticipating your first tram journey, where should you get off, how much will it cost? As the rickety tram passes through Sheffield, you see the vast amount of people here. Some people already outside pubs, giving each other abuse, others just minding their own business, doing their shopping. Next stop: Castle Square. Here is my stop.


Castle Market
Victoria Beardwood

Amidst the perpetual cloud of people and plastic bags and preying grey skies, it hovers there. The camera flashes of unaware tourists emblazon its metallic insignia so it rivals the beacons of the high street for a second. But no matter what the aperture or the exposure, a transient image shown as part of a holiday slide show has no meaning.

As though the world had been compressed, things that should not be adjacent are thrown together and work together as if no one had noticed the Earth move. Incandescent tutus line up like a well-dressed military outfit, waiting for orders. They try in vain to separate themselves from the jungle of handbags, overnight bags, all-purpose bags that burst from the stall next door, filling every space they can. Rolls of fabric linger round their dwelling, leaning like dominos in mid-fall on the neighbouring shoe shop. A queue emerging from the citrus 60’s barbershop stretches to the nearby cluster of cafés and two collections of conversations merge into one. And the clients with shaggy hair watch as café customers indulge in toasted teacakes, while those who are eating have the flavour marred by the constant smell of raw fish and meat from the level below.

It’s funny how the transition from one room to another, the thin portal of a doorway, can make such a difference. I saw Atlantis that day. I found it myself with only a little help from your small-town memories. Those tin pot treasures unfurled before my rose-tinted eyes, and the vibrant colours of that sentimental wealth radiated from the overflowing market stalls and ricocheted off the fading walls. I remember a day like this. It was the racing that did it for me. My heart and feet could relate to it. The forgotten faces of these old-time merchants selling their kaleidoscopic wares, and the bustling broods of regulars are what make this cherished entity exciting and galvanising, and different from the Saturday morning push- and-shove of steely anoraks and black umbrellas on the well-trodden paving stones just outside.

And so it hovers there, another anachronism, a weathered face amongst the botoxed masses, and it feels right.


Fargate
Melanie Hale

“Next stop by request: Cathedral.” Alight from the Supertram, Fargate. So many shops. H&M, Boots, McDonald’s. This is today. Each building different from the next: Victorian stone, 1960s concrete, and modern day glass. Browns, greys, blacks. Every one has a story, all from a different era boasting their own magnificence like it is a fashion parade: the audience do the walking down the middle; the models stand still on the side, ready to be admired. “River Island or New Look for a Barbour jacket?”

Once, a sea of eyes and joyous salutations stormed the high street, now littered with apologies as the busy, rushing consumer looks up from their phones only when they collide with another inattentive punter. Times change, but the buildings keep history alive. Coles Corner. Once the official city meeting place, then the Albert Hall cinema. Burnt down, the building sparked up a new opportunity: Starbucks. Coffee. This is Fargate. So many shops and so much past forever in the background.


(view from) the Arts Tower
Christina Barningham

From down here you disappear in the shadow, its mere presence is a victory; you are insignificant. Restored. Dominant. Drenched in legal formaldehyde, this immortal beacon offers refuge for those who are reared to engineer. You never linger for too long in this shadow, as the brisk air of ambition blows you swiftly inside, to take a leap of faith on the paternoster - here it comes - quick - before you miss it.

From up here you see the city seep. It pours into the valleys, meanders through the surrounding countryside, cradles the authoritarian hilltops, dilutes the pure wilderness. It stretches far. A panorama of the entire landscape, inspiring the restless pencils which sketch out our future. This once stainless city begins to rust, revealing a new image. The remanence of prosperity remains in the sturdy infrastructure - but now the ceilings drip - tick-tock-tick-tock - Sheffield awaits a new future. No longer dormant, she is ready to remove the sheath, to uncover its sharp blade of success protected within.

The cold northern wind sweeps in hungry minds from all corners of the globe. Vital oxygen to fuel the fire. They too are consumed by the flames, which lick the red bricks of the city; they feed from every morsel and devour the dreams of those who have gone before. The gentle ebb and flow of these pensive souls form the only tide. Nothing can extinguish this ignited landlocked city.


Kelham Island
Savannah Dawsey-Hewitt

Walking towards Kelham Island; to one side, the ascending Arts Tower dominates the horizon, detracting the eye from the mounds encompassing it. After descending the hill, one becomes submerged - the structures of Sheffield are blurs in the distance, faint but visible through the cloud. Only lower than the ground is the River Don; flowing through the district, which was once only green or machinery. The steel furnace still steals the view, but the Fat Cat provides the warmth this evening. At sunset the lamps are lit, transforming the garden into a golden haze. The bonfire breathes hot air onto our faces, and belches copper beams into the night sky. Across the water, people appreciate the lightshow from the balconies of the Kelham Island flats, which encroach on the fragment remains of the decrepit but adamant Furnace Trail, refusing to yield, not allowing the vicinity to be overtaken by modern superstructures.

Now, the whole district is brimming with bodies, just as it was when people first arrived- but Guy Fawkes is the fire for the factories tonight. In the Riverside, the fire roars. Outside, kaleidoscopic corkscrews are reflecting on the Don, illuminating the murky stream. Spirits are high and laughter can be heard from every corner, a far cry from when the district was silent- the chatter of the city only a whisper in the distance.


Devonshire Green
Charles McDonald-Jones

Skateboards roar like bombs dropped decades ago. Eyes closed, I run my fingers through the grass where I am lying. I can smell it too; the freshness of the land tinged with stale tobacco smoke. Glasses clink from the beer garden nearby amongst subdued conversations, interrupted occasionally by rapturous laughter. I open my eyes to the sky far above me, to the clouds all billowing like smoke of the city's past, just waiting to burst and wash the dirt away.

I raise my head. Sitting up, I see people rushing about their daily lives all caught up in the higgledy-piggledy chaos of Sheffield city centre. Though mere metres from where I sit, this strange hecticness seems like the world away. In the distance I hear the screech of a bus brake. But not here. Here, a girl sits reading, leaning against a tree whose branches gently creak as the wind sweeps through it. Here, one sits unperturbed by the world outside passing by. Here, the world moves slower, at the pace of those flowers blossoming over the walls upon which people sit, coffee in hand, to forget about the day.

I stretch upwards, my figure in contrast against the Steel City standing tall like the trees. Outside this bubble the city is a storm with waves crashing as loud as car engines rumble.

I walk over to the skate park, all battered and graffitied yet far from desolate. I climb up onto the wall and sit on the other side. The smell of bloodshot eyes and euphoria emanates from somewhere close by. People drink beers from bottles. Carrier bags rustle and skateboards hit the ground. I sit entranced by the boards and the BMXs as they go up and down, round and round. I lose myself in the drones of the wheels as they rocket past.

I wake from my daze and walk once more through the sea of tranquillity that is Devonshire Green. I pass black cabs hovering like hawks ready for their next victim as I head up to West St. Already I can hear the sounds of students stumbling from pub to pub, slurring their words as they go. I raise my head and am engulfed once more by reality.


Broomhill
Amy Sheffield

Here, two polar opposite walks of life co-exist in the same pocket of the city. One barely out of the nursery, as the other sits in a retirement home clutching pipe and slippers. I swim against the ever-flowing river of commuters, towards Endcliffe and Ranmoor. These fresh-faced clusters of flats are new pimples on the teenage landscape I pace through; their pale brick and groomed gardens standing out as a foreign body while the charred Victorian terraces proudly line the main street, with their greying beards and walking sticks appear to be right at home. The gardens I pass conjure images of an elderly chap with hair sprouting from his ears, altogether more unkempt.

Underwhelming Broomhill. I wander along the parade of shops, joining the throng once again. As I glance down the hill on this rare meander down Whitham Road, I can sense the bustling University campus and the city beyond galloping up to meet me.


Crookes Valley Park
Joel Baker

Sat on one of the banks which make up the four sides of Crookes Valley Park, cocooned in a square of land cut below street level, where birds loudly proclaim the superiority of their song over the senseless noise of nearby traffic and the grey of urban space cannot hold sway, I was finally forced to admit summer was over. Of course, it had been getting colder for weeks, but for how long had the trees looked like this? All around, nothing but the grass was green – orange, gold, yellow and red all accused me (rightly) of not having been observant enough beforehand. Even the normally cold, grey form of the University of Sheffield Arts Tower poking out above the trees – glass, steel and 1960s concrete – joined in; like a butterfly which gets to be beautiful for only a small part of its life it reflected the rays of the setting sun with such intensity that the light seemed to take physical form around it, a brazen gold beacon of defiance to all those who normally consider it ugly, a bloated grey caterpillar which has stood itself on end and sat astride the city. Though like a butterfly its beauty would rapidly leave this world, a bright flower closing up as the sun dipped leisurely below the horizon, becoming a faint white glimmer before disappearing entirely.

On the lake in the middle of the park, members of a kayak club paddle up and down, throwing a ball to one another. The kayaks hark back to the rowing boats, painted like children’s toys, which people used to hire. They have since faded into the past, just like the motorboat, which took people on rides around the lake. In the failing light they are their ghosts and shadows.

Time passes. People begin to go home. The play-park and bowling greens have been abandoned by the city’s young families and pensioners as darkness falls; the students are now at home. There are still some young couples, joined by a skeleton crew of joggers and dog-walkers. But they are starting to go too. Tomorrow, people will return. Different people, most likely, who will contribute to the character of this little green corner of Sheffield, ensuring it is slightly different every day, without ever seeming to change.


Millhouses Park
Amy Seager

I walk at a brisk pace, carefully scanning all around, so as not to miss anything. The sky is not the bright blue of previous visits: today only monotonous grey cloud can be seen. Nevertheless, this lunchtime the park is as peaceful as any other – elderly women nattering, office workers reading on their break from work, the occasional grandparent with a tiny grandchild at the edge of the boating lake now closed for winter. The grass is still green, and the flowers still bloom, giving off a sweet scent that is barely noticeable on this breezeless day. The river that gives Sheffield its name, the Sheaf, runs through the bottom of the park, making the air chilly but fresh as you walk along the riverside beneath the balding trees.

I look longingly at the adventure playground as I stride by, wishing there would have been such a place for recreation in Folkestone when I was growing up: somewhere to make my own adventure. The Splash! project is empty today: too cold for young children to be getting wet, and the long-haired inhabitants of the skate-park are at school and college. I come to the all-ages gym equipment, also empty today, unlike on warm summer Sunday evenings, and it is time to turn back. Ahead of me there are only bare fields and dog- walkers; the excitement is behind me. I turn round to face the tennis courts in the distance and head back towards the exit, relishing the last bit of time I spend here before returning home.

This is the haven of tranquillity I used to watch week after week from the windows of the overcrowded Transpennine Express; it once seemed so distant to me, and in many ways still is. But now I have finally found it, it is my escape from the world, from university and from work. I sigh as I pass through the gap in the hedge and on to the main road, looking forward to my next visit.


Sheffield, November 2011

Download the ePub Print

Het station van Sheffield voorbij

Dit citybook werd geschreven door studenten van de Universiteit Sheffield/SLC (School of Languages and Cultures) als onderdeel van een speciale module rond het concept van citybooks. Een groep tweedejaarsstudenten ging op zoek naar het effect en het belang van verhalen en het vertellen van verhalen op wie we zijn en wie we graag zouden willen zijn. Citybooksauteur Agnes Lehóczky begeleidde de studenten bij het onderdeel ‘creative writing’ van de module.. Ze hielp de studenten hun gevoelens verwoorden over steden in het algemeen en over Sheffield in het bijzonder. De studenten kozen elf straten, parken, gebouwen en vergeten uithoeken van Sheffield. Ze probeerden elk hun gekozen plek zo goed mogelijk te doorgronden door beroep te doen op hun indrukken, verbeelding, creativiteit en historisch onderzoek. Het eindresultaat is dit gezamenlijk citybook. De Nederlandse vertaling werd gerealiseerd door Eva Marynissen, in het kader van een stageproject bij deBuren. Lees meer over haar vertaalervaring in deze Aantekening uit het ondergrondse.

De studenten:
Joel Baker, Christina Barningham, Victoria Beardwood, Savannah Dawsey-Hewitt, Melanie Hale, Rachel Jackson, Charles McDonald-Jones, Amy Seager, Amy Sheffield, Louise Snape, Glenn Turner

© henriette louwerse

 

Het treinstation van Sheffield
Rachel Jackson

Alleen, in het midden van de betonnen cocon van de inkomhal van het treinstation van Sheffield, staat een slonzige student. Herkenbaar aan het typische net-uit-bed-kapsel en de schijnbare pijn die ze ervaren terwijl hun ogen wennen aan het kunstmatige daglicht. Het is half acht ’s ochtends. Het geschuifel van veel te dure schoenen en het geklik van onverantwoord hoge hakken neemt toe terwijl de werkbijen van het kapitalisme in uniform voorbij marcheren, zonder te beseffen dat ze de koffer van een koppel beschadigd hebben en een kind van zijn moeder scheidden. Zij zullen hun trein halen. Een koppel zwaait elkaar uit en een van hen wankelt blindelings achteruit richting het perron, om toch maar niet het oogcontact te verbreken en liefdeloos over te komen. De stank van goedkope koffie overspoelt de hal en de oudbakken smaak van zakenpraatjes hangt in de warme lucht.

Op zoek naar toeverlaat gaat de student het gebouw uit. Water groet de zintuigen en reinigt ze tot grote opluchting. Aan de rechterkant leidt een metalen gedrocht de afdalende reizigers naar het station terwijl het tegelijkertijd met zijn weerspiegelend oppervlak een oplossing biedt voor het net-uit-bed-kapsel van de student. De zon staat ondertussen hoger en brengt een overvloed aan regenbogen teweeg die op de kunstmatige rivieren dansen, tot grote vreugde van voorbij wandelende kinderen. Ze stoppen en staren vol verwondering totdat de illusie versperd wordt door een stoet werkbijen die de waterstroom volgen tot aan de automatische deuren van de inkomhal. De wind kietelt en plaagt de student, wordt sterker en geselt elk stukje blote huid. Het water gaat mee de strijd aan en dus trekt de student zich terug in de warmte van de betonnen cocon.

Een bende kostuums staat onbeweeglijk te staren naar de hoge mechanische dienstregeling die hun lot weergeeft. De trein heeft vertraging. Het irritant geschuifel wordt een levendige tred naarmate de klok verder tikt. De student maakt zich net op om mee te doen met de opwarming wanneer een enkele 6 op het scherm verschijnt en de race begint. Er ontstaat een stormloop die de student meevoert naar het platform, waar de afwezigheid van wagons reizigers die achterop geraakt waren de kans biedt om weer bij de kudde aan te sluiten. De grond begint te daveren en een scherp gepiep kondigt de komst van de East Midlands-trein aan. Ze hebben de trein gehaald.

 

Park Hill
Louise Snape

Park Hill i love you, will u marry me
Zittend, met de benen tegen de borst gedrukt, snuffend, op het allerhoogste punt van een heuvel, in een vervallen en eenzame speeltuin.

Waar de wind de scherven van een flesje Carlsberg de grond induwt. Waar hij tegen het bakstenen muurtje beukt en tussen de gaatjes van je sjaal kruipt. Hij je oren rood kleurt en je knokkels blauw. Waar je haar aan je hoofd probeert te ontsnappen. Waar je neus gaat lopen.

Waar de heuvels in elke richting glooien en achteloos de stad uitdijen, een verzameling ongecoördineerde kleuren en vormen creërend. Waar de sociale wijk erachter erbij staat als een vermoeid leger, bleek en grijs, met stukjes harnas die losgekomen zijn. Waar de schoorstenen rook spuwen uit de ondergrondse dieptes en de patronen in de lucht doen verkleuren.

Zittend, met de benen tegen de borst gedrukt, snuffend, op het allerhoogste punt van een heuvel, in een vervallen en eenzame speeltuin.

Waar de Victorian Pye Bank Primary School zich aftekent langs een stukje ongebruikte weg, leeg en alleen. Waar als je hard genoeg denkt kindervoetjes door de gangen trappelen. De piano galmt door de hal. Ontsmettende prikkels van pas geschaafde knieën. Potato Smilies en papperige erwten bedwelmen de kantine. Roddels en onwaarheden worden gefluisterd in de lerarenkamer. Schreeuwen van kustikkertje vliegen over het speelplein. De nietjesmachine perforeert een teveel aan gekleurd papier. Waar kleine hartjes opgewonden bloed pompen door kleine lichamen.

 

West Street
Glen Turner

West Street, het hart van Sheffield, met een groot aantal cafés, winkels en restaurants. Ik stond tegenover Tesco en keek hoe de wereld voorbijging. Allerlei soorten mensen snellen langs je heen als je op de sneltram staat te wachten. Bejaarden die met hun overvolle boodschappentassen sleuren en meegesleept worden door golven studenten die zich naar hun colleges haasten, nu al te laat. Het verkeersrumoer en het gewoonlijke gekeuvel vult de straat. Af en toe klinkt er een irritante beltoon die je afleidt van het bewonderen van deze geweldige straat. Wanneer je in het rond kijkt zie je allerlei soorten gebouwen, sommige raken de wolken, andere zijn slechts enkele verdiepingen hoog. De tram komt schurend tot stilstand, de mechanische deuren schuiven open. Enthousiaste kinderen wringen langs je heen want de school is net uit. Ze vragen zich af hoe ze de rest van de dag zullen vullen. Je stapt in, je bereidt je eerste tramreis voor, waar moet je afstappen, hoeveel zal het kosten? Terwijl de gammele tram door Sheffield rijdt, zie je het enorme aantal mensen hier. Sommigen staan elkaar al uit te schelden buiten de pubs, anderen gaan hun eigen gangetje, doen boodschappen. Volgende halte: Castle Square. Dit is mijn eindhalte.

 

Castle Market
Victoria Beardwood

Tussen de eeuwige wolk van mensen en plastic zakken en de dreigende grijze lucht zweeft het daar. De cameraflitsen van onwetende toeristen doen zijn metalen opschrift schitteren zodat het even concurreert met de straatverlichting van de winkelstraat. Maar ongeacht de lensopening of belichting is een kortstondig beeld als onderdeel van een diashow met vakantiefoto’s niet van betekenis.

Alsof de wereld werd samengeperst, worden dingen die niet naast elkaar horen bij elkaar gegooid. Ze werken samen alsof niemand de Aarde had voelen bewegen. Fluorescerende tutu’s presenteren zich op een rij als een goedgeklede legeroutfit, klaar voor bevelen. Ze proberen zich tevergeefs te onderscheiden van de jungle van handtassen, slaapzakken en multifunctionele tassen die uit het kraampje ernaast puilen en die elk mogelijk plekje opvullen. Rollen textiel slingeren rond in hun winkeltje en leunen als vallende dominostenen tegen de schoenwinkel ernaast. Vanuit de knaloranje jaren 60-kapperszaak vertrekt een rij tot aan de cluster van cafés vlakbij en twee soorten conversaties vermengen zich tot een. De klanten met hun wilde haren kijken toe hoe de cafégangers zich tegoed doen aan geroosterde teacakes, terwijl zij die eten gehinderd worden door de constante geur van rauwe vis en vlees van een verdieping lager.

Het is gek hoe de overgang van de ene naar de andere kamer, een smal portaal, zo’n verschil kan maken. Ik heb die dag Atlantis gezien. Ik vond het op m’n eentje met wat hulp van jouw kleinstedelijke herinneringen. Die prulletjes die zich voor mijn optimistische ogen uitstallen, en de felle kleuren van die sentimentele rijkdommen die uit de uitpuilende kraampjes stralen en kaatsen tegen de verbleekte muren. Ik herinner me een dag net als deze. Het kwam door al het gehol. Mijn hart en voeten konden zich er in vinden. De vergeten gezichten van deze ouderwetse handelaars die hun caleidoscopische waar verkopen en de jachtige kudde habitués maken het gekoesterde geheel opwindend en prikkelend, anders dan het getrek en geduw van grijze anoraks en zwarte paraplu’s op de veelbetreden straatstenen net erbuiten.

En dus zweeft het daar, het zoveelste anachronisme, een verweerd gezicht in de gebotoxte massa, en het voelt goed.

 

Fargate
Melanie Hale

‘Volgende halte op aanvraag: Kathedraal.’ Afstappen van de sneltram, Fargate. Zoveel winkels. H&M, Boots, McDonald’s. Zo is het vandaag. Elk gebouw is anders: Victoriaanse baksteen, betongevels uit 1960, moderne glasgevels. Bruine, grijze, zwarte. Ze hebben elk een verhaal, uit een verschillende tijd. Ze scheppen op over hun eigen pracht als was het een modeshow: het publiek loopt door het midden, de modellen staan stil aan de kant, klaar om bewonderd te worden. 'Naar River Island of naar New Look voor een regenjasje?'

Ooit was de winkelstraat een zee van ogen en vrolijke begroetingen, nu vervuild met verontschuldigingen van druk bezette consumenten die enkel van hun gsm opkijken als ze op een andere onoplettende risiconemer botsen. Tijden veranderen, maar de gebouwen houden de geschiedenis levend. Coles Corner. Ooit was het de officiële ontmoetingsplaats in de stad, de toenmalige Albert Hall-bioscoop. Die brandde af en maakte plaats voor iets nieuws: Starbucks. Koffie. Dit is Fargate. Zoveel winkels en zoveel geschiedenis voor altijd op de achtergrond.

 

(uitzicht vanaf) de Arts Tower
Christina Barningham

Hier beneden verdwijn je in de schaduw, enkel al zijn aanwezigheid is een overwinning; jij bent onbenullig. Gerestaureerd. Dominant. Gedrenkt in legale formaldehyde is deze onsterfelijke baken een toevluchtsoord voor wie tot ingenieur gekweekt wordt. Je blijft nooit te lang in deze schaduw rondhangen, want de levendige bries van ambitie blaast je snel naar binnen, om je kans te wagen, op hoop van zegen de paternosterlift in – daar komt hij aan – snel – voordat je hem mist.

Van hierboven zie je de stad sijpelen. Ze stroomt door de valleien, meandert door het platteland errond, omarmt de autoritaire heuveltoppen, verdunt de pure woestenij. Ze strekt zich ver uit. Een panorama van het volledige landschap inspireert de rusteloze potloden die onze toekomst schetsen. Deze stad die ooit roestvrij was begint te roesten en onthult een nieuw imago. De remanentie van succes blijft zichtbaar in de robuuste infrastructuur – maar nu lekken de plafonds – tik-tak-tik-tak – er wacht Sheffield een nieuwe toekomst. Niet langer slapend, ze is klaar om de schede weg te nemen, om haar scherp lemmet van succes te onthullen dat binnenin schuilde.

De koude noorderwind raast in hongerige geesten vanuit alle hoeken van de wereld. Vitale zuurstof om het vuur aan te wakkeren. Ook zij worden verteerd door de vlammen, die de rode bakstenen van de stad lekken; ze voeden zich met elk brokje en verslinden de dromen van voorgangers. De kalme eb en vloed van die peinzende geesten zijn het enige tij. Niets kan deze brandende stad die omsingeld is door land blussen.

 

Het Kelham-eiland
Savannah Dawsey-Hewitt

Wandel richting het Kelham-eiland; aan de ene kant domineert de rijzige Arts Tower de horizon en onttrekt de omringende heuvels aan het zicht. Daal de heuvel af en je wordt ondergedompeld – de vormen van Sheffield zijn vlekken in de verte, vaag maar zichtbaar in de mist. Het enige dat lager dan de grond ligt is de rivier de Don; die vloeit door het gebied, dat ooit enkel groen was of de kleur had van machines. De staaloven beheerst nog steeds het uitzicht, maar de Fat Cat-pub zorgt voor de warmte vanavond. Bij zonsondergang gaan de lampen aan en wordt de tuin in een gouden waas gehuld. Het kampvuur ademt warme lucht op onze gezichten en spuwt koperen stralen de nachtelijke lucht in. Aan de andere kant van het water genieten mensen van de lichtshow vanaf de balkons van de Kelham-flatgebouwen, die zich opdringen aan de overblijfselen van de afgetakelde maar onvermurwbare Furnace-route, die weerstand biedt aan nieuwe, moderne gebouwen.

Nu wemelt het hele district van de mensen, net zoals toen de mensen hier voor het eerst aankwamen – maar vanavond wakkert Guy Fawkes het vuur aan voor de fabrieken. In restaurant The Riverside raast het vuur. Buiten worden caleidoscopische kurkendraaiers weerspiegeld op de Don waardoor de donkere rivier oplicht. De sfeer zit erin en gelach weerklinkt uit elke hoek, heel anders dan toen het district stil was – het geklets van de stad niet meer dan gefluister in de verte.

 

Het Devonshire Green-park
Charles McDonald-Jones

Skateboards bulderen als bommen die decennia geleden vielen. Met gesloten ogen strelen mijn vingers het gras waar ik lig. Ik kan het ook ruiken; de versheid van de streek die doortrokken is van oude tabaksrook. Glazen klinken in de nabije biertuin tussen gedempte gesprekken, af en toe onderbroken door hartstochtelijk gelach. Ik open mijn ogen voor de lucht hoog boven mij, voor de wolken die voorbijtrekken zoals rook uit het verleden van de stad. Ze wachten om open te breken en het vuil weg te spoelen.

Ik hef mijn hoofd op. Ik ga rechtop zitten en zie mensen haastig hun dagelijkse taken afwerken. Ze gaan op in de rommelige chaos van het centrum van Sheffield. Ook al gebeurt het maar op enkele meters van waar ik zit, deze vreemde drukte lijkt mijlenver. In de verte hoor ik het gepiep van een remmende bus. Maar niet hier. Hier zit een meisje te lezen, ze leunt tegen een boom waarvan de takken zachtjes kraken wanneer de wind erdoor blaast. Hier word je niet gestoord door de buitenwereld die voorbijkomt. Hier draait de wereld trager, aan het tempo van de bloemen die over de muur groeien waarop mensen zitten met een koffie in de hand, om de dag te vergeten.

Ik rek me uit, mijn gedaante in contrast met de Staalstad die oprijst, hoog als de bomen. Buiten deze bubbel is de stad een storm met golven die beuken, zo luid als de ronkende motoren van auto’s.

Ik wandel naar het skatepark, dat vol graffiti zit en beschadigd, maar toch verre van verlaten is. Ik klim op de muur en ga aan de andere kant zitten. Van ergens dichtbij komt de geur van bloeddoorlopen ogen en euforie. Mensen drinken bier uit flesjes. Draagtasjes ritselen en skateboards raken de grond. Ik kijk gehypnotiseerd naar de skateboards en de BMX’en die op en neer gaan, steeds opnieuw. Ik verlies mezelf in het gespin van de wielen die voorbij razen.

Ik ontwaak uit mijn hypnose en wandel nog eens door de zee van rust die men Devonshire Green noemt. Terwijl ik richting West Street stap, kom ik voorbij zwarte taxi’s die als haviken rondzweven en wachten op hun volgende prooi. Ik hoor de studenten al die brabbelend van pub naar pub strompelen. Ik hef mijn hoofd op en word nog maar eens ondergedompeld in de realiteit.

 

De Broomhill-wijk
Amy Sheffield

Hier wonen twee polair tegengestelde bevolkingsgroepen samen in hetzelfde stukje van de stad. De ene groep is nauwelijks uit de luiers, de andere zit in een bejaardentehuis met een pijp en pantoffels.

Ik zwem in tegen de continue stroom van pendelaars, richting Endcliffe en Ranmoor. Deze clusters van frisse flatgebouwen zijn nieuwe puisten op het puberlandschap waar ik doorheen wandel; hun bleke bakstenen en goed onderhouden tuinen lijken niet thuis te horen tussen de verkoolde Victoriaanse huizen die trots een rij vormen in de hoofdstraat en die met hun grijze baarden en wandelstokken op hun plaats lijken staan. De tuinen die ik voorbijloop, roepen het beeld op van een bejaarde vent met haar dat uit zijn oren komt, een beetje onverzorgd.

Het niet echt indrukwekkende Broomhill. Ik kuier langs de stoet van winkels. Ik voeg me opnieuw bij de mensenmassa. Terwijl ik een blik werp naar beneden vanaf de heuvel op deze zeldzame tocht door Whitham Road kan ik de bruisende universiteitscampus voelen en daarachter de stad, die me galopperend komt groeten.

 

Crookes Valley Park
Joel Baker

Op een van de vier oevers van Crookes Valley Park, ontspannen zittend op een stukje land dat lager ligt dan het straatniveau, waar de vogels de superioriteit van hun liederen tegenover het betekenisloze geraas van het verkeer luid verkondigen en waar het grijs van de stedelijke ruimtes niet overheerst, moest ik noodgedwongen toegeven dat de zomer voorbij was. Het was natuurlijk al enkele weken kouder aan het worden, maar hoe lang zagen de bomen er al zo uit? Overal rondom mij was enkel het gras nog groen – oranje, goud, geel en rood beschuldigden mij er (terecht) van niet goed te hebben opgelet. Zelfs de gewoonlijk koude, grijze vorm van de University of Sheffield Arts Tower die boven de bomen uitsteekt – glas, staal en jaren 60-beton – deden mee; net als een vlinder die maar een kleine portie van zijn leven zo prachtig is, reflecteerde hij de stralen van de ondergaande zon met zo’n intensiteit dat het licht errond leek te materialiseren, een goudgeel baken van opstandigheid tegen iedereen die hem ooit lelijk vond, een opgeblazen grijze rups die zichzelf eindeloos rechthield en schrijlings op de stad zat. Net zoals een vlinder zou zijn pracht echter snel de wereld uit zijn, een felgekleurde bloem die sluit terwijl de zon kalmpjes onder de horizon zakt, een zwak wit schijnsel wordt en dan volledig verdwijnt.

Op de vijver in het midden van het park peddelen leden van een kajakclub heen en weer en gooien een bal naar elkaar. De kajaks doen denken aan de felgekleurde roeibootjes die op speelgoed leken en die mensen hier vroeger huurden. Ze maken nu deel uit van het verleden, net als de motorboot waarop mensen ritjes rond het meer maakten. In het tanende licht zijn ze geesten en schaduwen.

De tijd gaat voorbij. Mensen maken zich op om naar huis te gaan. Wanneer het donker valt verlaten de jonge families en gepensioneerden van de stad de speeltuin en petanquebanen; de studenten zitten nu thuis. Er zijn nog enkele jonge koppels, samen met de vaste kern joggers en mensen die hun hond uitlaten. Maar zij vertrekken ook stilaan. Morgen zullen er opnieuw mensen zijn. Andere mensen, hoogstwaarschijnlijk, die zullen bijdragen aan het karakter van deze kleine groene hoek van Sheffield en die ervoor zorgen dat het park elke dag lichtjes anders is, zonder dat het ooit lijkt te veranderen.

 

Millhouses Park
Amy Seager

Ik wandel aan een stevig tempo en kijk zorgvuldig rond om zeker niets te missen. De lucht is niet zo blauw als bij vorige bezoeken: vandaag zijn er enkel monotone grijze wolken te zien. Toch is het in het park vanmiddag even vredig als anders – bejaarde vrouwen die babbelen, kantoorbedienden die wat lezen tijdens hun pauze, hier en daar een grootouder met een piepjong kleinkind aan de rand van het meer dat nu afgesloten is voor de winter. Het gras is nog groen, de bloemen staan nog in bloei en verspreiden een zoete geur die nauwelijks merkbaar is op deze windstille dag. De rivier waaraan Sheffield zijn naam dankt, de Sheaf, loopt langs de rand van het park en maakt de lucht koud maar ook verfrissend wanneer je langs de oever loopt onder de kalende bomen.

Vol verlangen kijk ik naar de speeltuin waaraan ik voorbij wandel. Was er maar zo’n speelterrein in Folkestone toen ik klein was; een plaats waar ik mijn eigen avonturen kon bedenken. De waterattractie Splash! is leeg vandaag: het is te koud voor jonge kinderen om nat te worden en de langharige skaters zitten op school en op de universiteit. Ik kom aan bij de fitnesstoestellen, die voor alle leeftijden zijn. Die zijn ook verlaten vandaag, in tegenstelling tot warme zondagavonden in de zomer. Het is tijd om terug te keren. Voor me zie ik enkel lege velden en wandelaars met hun hond; de sensatie ligt achter me. Ik draai me om en zie de tennisvelden in de verte. Ik vertrek richting de uitgang en koester dat laatste beetje tijd dat ik hier doorbreng voor ik naar huis ga.

Dit is de haven van rust waarnaar ik vroeger week na week keek vanuit de ramen van de stampvolle Transpennine Express; ooit leek dit parkje zo veraf, en in veel opzichten is het dat nog steeds. Maar nu ik het eindelijk gevonden heb, is het mijn toevluchtsoord om te ontsnappen aan de wereld, aan de universiteit en aan het werk. Ik zucht wanneer ik door de opening in de haag de hoofdstraat in stap en kijk al uit naar mijn volgende bezoekje.

 

Sheffield, november 2011.